Saturday, December 4

Animal Crossing Guide: New Horizons: The Bugs of November | Digital Trends Spanish


New arrive every month bugs to Animal Crossing: New Horizons. Did you know that collecting them is important to fill your Capturapedia and your museum (and win a few berries)? It may take time to master the art of catching them. And you need to sneak up on them and get your hands on them before they fly or run away, not to mention there are scorpions or tarantulas that can knock you out. Check here all the bugs of November 2021 in our guide Animal Crossing: New Horizons.

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Some tips for catching bugs

There are ways to help bugs not escape. Make sure you have the pole, ladder, and net in your inventory. The insects will appear all over the island, so you will have to go every corner to find all the different types. If your priority in the game is to catch bugs, having two nets in your inventory could be useful; so if one breaks, you won’t have to go back to the Nook Warehouses or craft one mid-hunt.

The chives cricket it is the only insect for which you will need a shovel. When hunting this beauty, carry a shovel and look for the screech that crickets make. When you think it can’t get louder, start digging. After a while the onion cricket will appear and you will have to quickly switch to the net to catch it.

The best way to catch the most dangerous critters, such as scorpions and tarantulas, is to sneak up on you. When you see one of these aggressive creatures, hold the net in your hand and press A to slowly approach. When they lift their front legs, stop moving forward and wait for them to lower them. Then move on. When you are close enough (or just before they run to attack you) release the A button and catch that rogue.

Bug List

Bugs in Animal Crossing

Animal Crossing: New Horizons it is very tied to the seasons of the real world. This means that new critters will arrive every month, just when they would arrive in real life. It also means that there will be different insects in the southern hemisphere and in the northern hemisphere. It is important to remember that the presence of insects will depend on the time of day.

What’s new in November 2021?

In November, you will find several changes to the bugs available. In the northern hemisphere, many of the insects that appeared in October remain, although the monarch butterfly, the long locust, the cricket, the mantis, among others, arrive. On the other hand, the yellow butterfly, the bell cricket, the stink bug, the ladybug, the tiger beetle and the scorpion have said goodbye.

The southern hemisphere also shows changes. Gone was the tarantula, which was replaced by the great purple emperor, banded dragonfly, water stilt walkers, fiddle beetle, scorpion, among others. Of course, many of the October critters are still available.

Below are the full lists of bugs for November 2021 in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

North Hemisphere

  • Common butterfly: 4 am to 7 pm (160 berries)
  • Paper kite butterfly: 8 am to 7 pm (1,000)
  • Monarch butterfly: 4 am to 5 pm (140)
  • Moth: 7 pm to 4 am (130)
  • Long lobster: 8 am to 7 pm (200)
  • Migratory lobster: from 8 am to 7 pm (600)
  • Rice grasshopper: 8 am to 7 pm (160)
  • Cricket: 5 pm to 8 am (130)
  • Mantis: 8 am to 5 pm (430)
  • Orchid mantis: 8 am to 5 pm (2400)
  • Wasp: all day (2500)
  • Zigoptera: all day (500)
  • Mole cricket: all day (500)
  • Violin beetle: all day (450)
  • Citrus longhorn beetle: all day (350)
  • Walking stick: from 4 am to 8 am and 5 pm to 7 pm (600)
  • Bag caterpillar: all day (600)
  • Ant: all day (80)
  • Hermit crab: 7 pm to 8 am (1,000)
  • Marine cockroach: all day (200)
  • Fly: all day (30)
  • flea: all day (70)
  • Snail: all day (250)
  • Pill bug: from 11 am to 4 pm (250)
  • Centipede: 4 pm to 11 pm (300)
  • Spider: 7 pm to 8 am (480)
  • Tarantula: 7 pm to 4 am (8,000)

Southern hemisphere

  • Common butterfly: from 4 am to 7 pm (160)
  • Yellow butterfly: from 4 am to 7 pm (160)
  • Tiger butterfly: from 4 am to 7 pm (240)
  • Peacock butterfly: 4 am to 7 pm (2500)
  • Paper kite butterfly: from 8 am to 7 pm (1000)
  • Great purple emperor: from 4 am to 7 pm (3000)
  • Agrias Butterfly: 8 am to 5 pm (3000)
  • Rajah Brooke’s Birdwing Butterfly: 8 am to 5 pm (2,500)
  • Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing Butterfly: 8 am to 4 pm (4,000)
  • Moth: 7 pm to 4 am (130)
  • Atlas moth: 7 pm to 4 am (3,000)
  • Madagascar Sunset Moth: 8 am to 4 pm (2,500)
  • Long lobster: 8 am to 7 pm (200)
  • Mantis: 8 am to 5 pm (430)
  • Orchid mantis: 8 am to 5 pm (2,400)
  • Bee: 8 am to 5 pm (200)
  • Wasp: all day (2500)
  • Dragonfly darner: 8 am to 5 pm (230)
  • Banded dragonfly: 8 am to 5 pm (4,000)
  • Mole cricket: all day (500)
  • Water striders: 8 am to 7 pm (130)
  • Diving beetle: 8 am to 7 pm (800)
  • Giant water bug: 7 pm to 8 am (2,000)
  • Bug: all day (120)
  • Stink bug with a man face: 7 pm to 8 am (1,000)
  • Ladybug: 8 am to 5 pm (200)
  • Tiger beetle: all day (1500)
  • Jewel beetle: all day (2400)
  • Violin beetle: all day (450)
  • Citrus longhorn beetle: all day (350)
  • Rosalia batesi beetle: all day, (3000)
  • Sack caterpillars: all day (600)
  • Ant: all day (80)
  • Hermit Crab: 7 pm until 8 am (1,000)
  • Marine cockroach: all day (200)
  • Fly: all day (60)
  • Flea: all day (70)
  • Snail: all day (250)
  • Pill bug: 11 pm to 4 pm (250)
  • Centipede: 4 pm to 11 pm (300)
  • Spider: 7 pm to 8 am (480)
  • Scorpion: 7 pm to 4 am (8,000)

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