Monday, July 26

virus

comida japonesa, coronavirus, Covid 19, natto, Noticias, plato japonés, Salud, SARS-CoV-2, tratamiento, virus

COVID-19: A treatment from a Japanese dish? | Digital Trends Spanish

Natto is a fermented soybean dish that is usually served for breakfast in Japan. It is one of the most traditional dishes of this nation and it has always been thought that it helps to have a longer life. Now, a group of researchers has discovered that the extract made from natto can inhibit the ability of the virus that causes COVID-19 to infect cells. "Traditionally, the Japanese have assumed that natto is beneficial to their health," says article author Tetsuya Mizutani, director of the Infectious Disease Prevention and Epidemiology Research Center at the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. “In recent years, research studies have revealed scientific evidence for this belief. In this study, we investigated the antiviral effects of natto on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that caus...
China, glaciar, hielo, investigadores, Noticias, Tendencias, Tibet, virus

15,000-year-old virus discovered in Tibetan glacier | Digital Trends Spanish

A team of scientists studying glacier ice has found nearly 15-year-old viruses in two ice samples taken from China's Tibetan Plateau. Most of these viruses, which have managed to survive frozen, do not resemble any other virus cataloged to date. The results, which were published in the journal Microbiome, could help experts understand how viruses have evolved over the centuries. "These glaciers formed gradually, and along with the dust and gases, a lot of viruses were also deposited on that ice," explains Zhi-Ping Zhong, lead author of the study and researcher at the Byrd State University Center for Polar and Climate Research. from Ohio. Ohio State University.“Glaciers in western China are not well studied, and our goal is to use this information to reflect past environments. And virus...
aire, contagios, contaminación atmosférica, contaminación del aire, coronavirus, Covid 19, Noticias, pacientes, pandemia, Salud, virus

Pollution makes a COVID-19 contagion more serious | Digital Trends Spanish

According to a new study presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID), long-term exposure to high levels of air pollutants, such as fine particulate matter (PM2.5), could have a significant influence on the results of people hospitalized for COVID-19. Thus, those in charge of the study discovered that the greater the exposure, the greater the risk. Indeed, every small increase (ug / m3) in long-term exposure to PM2.5 is associated with more than three times the probability of receiving mechanical ventilation and twice the probability of staying in the ICU. "Our study draws attention to the systemic inequalities that may have led to the marked differences in COVID-19 outcomes based on race and ethnicity," says Dr. Anita Shallal of Detroit'...
antivirus, antivirus gratuitos para PC, antivirus para PC, Computación, malware en computadoras, protección contra Ransomware, RansomWare, ransomware WannaCry, virus

How to enable ransomware protection in Windows | Digital Trends Spanish

Few malware attacks are as annoying or potentially costly as data hijacking. Yes - it's really scary, but there are ways to protect your devices. One of the newer and easier options is to use the service that Windows 10 offers in a comprehensive way by enabling the ransomware protection controlling access to files. We will show you how to activate it and what this means for the security of Windows in the future. You will be interested in: Once your computer is infected, this type of virus prevents you from accessing valuable files and requires you to send a payment in exchange for releasing them. Even large corporations have been attacked, some of which have made huge payments to get their digital property back. Step 1: go to Windows Security Log into Windows 10, head to the search ...
China, coronavirus, Covid 19, Huanan, Noticias, Salud, secuencias genéticas, virus, Wuhan

Coronavirus: Lost Genetic Sequences Found in Wuhan | Digital Trends Spanish

Although the planet has been dealing with the serious consequences of the pandemic for more than a year and a half, the real causes of the disease are still unknown. Last year, the genetic sequences of more than 200 samples from the first COVID-19 cases in Wuhan disappeared from a database. They were thirteen partial genetic sequences deleted from Google Cloud, which were part of some of the cases that appeared in this Chinese city. Fortunately, a scientist has been able to find some of them. Getty Images / Digital Trends GraphicJesse Bloom, virologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, has written a report describing his finding, noting that the deletion of these sequences is suspicious. "It seems likely that the sequences were removed to hide their existence," he says. "...
epidemia, gripe, Salud, sol, Tendencias, virus

The role of the Sun in the transmission of respiratory diseases | Digital Trends Spanish

Why do most respiratory viral diseases spread cyclically in autumn and winter in temperate regions of the world? An interdisciplinary team from the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, the University of Milan, Lombardy's regional agency for the environment, and the Don Gnocchi Foundation, claim that the answer is closely related to the Sun. The researchers developed a theoretical model that shows that both the prevalence and the evolution of epidemics are strongly correlated with the amount of daily solar irradiation that reaches a certain place on Earth at a certain time of year. “Our model offers a simple answer to an important scientific question, still unresolved. Why do many viral respiratory epidemics, such as influenza, develop cyclically during the fall and winter o...
aguas residuales, análisis, coronavirus, Covid 19, cuarentena, estudio, hospital, investigadores, Noticias, pandemia, rebrotes, Salud, SARS-CoV-2, virus, yale

Gold mine wastewater to combat COVID-19 | Digital Trends Spanish

They may not look good or look good, but analysis of the wastewater could provide researchers with important information about COVID-19. They can be, for example, a premature indicator of the existence of an outbreak of the disease, as well as provide information on the effectiveness of the adoption of quarantine by a population. "Wastewater is really a gold mine for information," says Jordan Peccia, a Yale professor of chemical and environmental engineering. If researchers can identify traces of COVID-19 in sewage sludge, they may be able to identify outbreaks and better understand how the virus spreads. For scientists, the concentration of COVID-19 RNA per milliliter of sewage sludge can indicate the presence or absence of the disease, as well as the way in which it spreads, eith...
calor, cobre, Contagio, coronavirus, diseño, infección, Mascarilla, mit, N95, Noticias, propagación, Salud, SARS-CoV-2, temperatura, virus

MIT Designs Mask That Inactivates Coronavirus With Heat | Digital Trends Spanish

The use of masks has been proven to be one of the most effective ways to avoid coronavirus infections. Aware of this, a group of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has designed a mask that inactivates the virus using heat. The researchers hope to develop this mask incorporating a heated copper mesh that runs on a battery and is surrounded by insulating neoprene. Thus, as the person wearing the mask breathes, the air flows through this mesh and the viral particles in the air are slowed down and inactivated due to this device and the high temperatures. MIT. This mask is expected to be of great use to healthcare professionals or the general public, especially when social distance cannot be respected. “This is a completely new mask concept in that it does ...
investigacion, Noticias, protistas, Salud, Tendencias, Universidad de Maine, virus

Protists: organisms that feed on viruses | Digital Trends Spanish

Protists - often microscopic and unicellular organisms - could feed on viruses, according to research published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology. Like viruses, protists live in the oceans by the billions, and some absorb marine viruses, it reported. The New York Times. If this claim is confirmed, it would tear down a century-old dogma: Viruses not only cause disease and extinguish life, in some cases they could feed and sustain it. A team led by Ramunas Stepanauskas, a microbial ecologist at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences at the University of Maine, started the project more than a decade ago. They originally intended to study the food preferences of marine protists, many of which eat bacteria. The researchers collected water samples from the Gulf of M...