Monday, November 29

How and when to see the longest partial lunar eclipse of the century | Digital Trends Spanish


Partial lunar eclipses may not be as spectacular as total ones, where the Moon is completely covered by Earth’s shadow, but they do occur more frequently. What does this mean? More opportunities to appreciate the changes in the Solar System, like this November 19. We tell you how and when to see the longest partial lunar eclipse of the century so you don’t miss any details.

You will be interested in:

For just over six hours on November 18 and November 19 (depending on where you are), the Sun, Earth, and Moon will come into near-perfect alignment and produce a partial lunar eclipse.

At the peak of the eclipse, at 9:02 UTC on November 19 (4:02 am EST / 1:02 am PST), when 99 percent of the face of the Moon will be covered by the dark inner part of the shadow of the Earth, called the umbra. The rest will be within the lighter outer side of the shadow, known as penumbra.

The longest of the century

Unsplash

From the moment the Moon enters the gloom of the Earth until the moment it leaves, the total duration of the eclipse will be around 21,693 seconds, about 6 hours 2 minutes).

This is an unusually long extension for such an event. It will even be longer than the total eclipse on May 26, 2021, which lasted 18.127 seconds, about an hour less.

The last time there was such a long partial lunar eclipse was on February 18, 1440, when the Incas built Machu Picchu or Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press.

Its long duration is explained by the fact that the peak of the eclipse occurs at a time when the Moon is approaching its apogee, its furthest point from Earth. And the further away it is, the slower it travels in its orbit, so the longer it takes to pass through Earth’s shadow.

How and when to see it

Map showing the visibility of the partial lunar eclipse from November 18 to 19.  Darker areas indicate greater visibility.
Map showing the visibility of the partial lunar eclipse from November 18 to 19. Darker areas indicate greater visibility. NASA / JPL-Caltech

The eclipse will be visible over a large swath of the planet, including North and South America, East Asia, Australia, and parts of Europe and Africa.

Anyway, you can also follow it online through the NASA YouTube channel, the place Virtual telescope or the portal Time and date.

If you dare to see it directly, you will have to get up early. In the United States, for observers on the east coast, the partial eclipse begins shortly after 2:00 a.m. and reaches its maximum at 4:00 a.m. On the west coast, meanwhile, it can be enjoyed from 11:00 pm on Thursday 18 and the peak will be around 1:00 am on Friday 19.

These are the hours, depending on where you live:

Beginning
of the eclipse
penumbral
Beginning
of the eclipse
partial
Point
maximum
Finished
of the eclipse
partial
Finished
of the eclipse
penumbral
UTC 6:02 am 7:18 am 9:02 am 10:47 am 12:03 pm
Argentina 3:02 am 4:18 am 5:39 am * 7:47 am ** 9:03 am **
Brazil 3:02 am 4:18 am 5:24 am * 7:47 am ** 9:03 am **
chili 3:02 am 4:18 am 6:02 am 7:47 am ** 9:03 am **
Colombia 1:02 am 2:18 am 4:02 am 5:47 am 7:03 am **
Ecuador 1:02 am 2:18 am 4:02 am 5:47 am 7:03 am **
Mexico 0:02 am 1:18 am 3:02 am 4:47 am 6:03 am
USA 1:02 am EST / 10:02 pm PST on November 18 2:18 am EST / 11:18 pm PST on November 18 4:02 am EST / 1:02 am PST 5:47 am EST / 2:47 am PST 7:03 am EST ** / 4:03 am PST
Spain 7:02 am 8:01 am * 10:02 am ** 11:47 am ** 1:03 pm **
Peru 1:02 am 2:18 am 4:02 am 5:47 am ** 7:03 am **
Uruguay 3:02 am 4:18 am 5:24 am * 7:47 am ** 9:03 am **
Caracas 2:02 am 3:18 am 5:02 am 6:47 am ** 8:03 am **

* Maximum visible point in that country.
** Not visible at that time.

Editor’s Recommendations








es.digitaltrends.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *