Friday, December 3

October could be a pivotal month in the coronavirus pandemic


Hello,

The coronavirus pandemic took another massive turn early Friday morning when President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19.

Like the rest of the world, we’ve been spending our day getting a sense of who might also be infected, as well as what the next few weeks might hold for the president of the US as he recovers. It’s all happening a month before the election. What a year.

Our colleagues have answers to all your questions about what Trump’s diagnosis could mean for the election and his presidency here.

This morning, Andrew Dunn spoke to Dr. David Boulware, a leading coronavirus treatment researcher. He told Andrew that Trump shouldn’t take hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug the president touted early in the pandemic as a potential treatment. Research in the past few months has found that the drug isn’t an effective treatment for COVID-19.

Here are the president’s best treatment options, according to Boulware.

(Before we dive into the rest of the headlines this week, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter here!)


Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine clinical trial, volunteer dosed with experimental COVID-19 vaccine

A clinical trial volunteer participates in Johnson & Johnson’s study to test a coronavirus vaccine candidate

Janssen


We could know if a vaccine works this month

It’s possible, if a bit unlikely, that we get results from coronavirus vaccine trials in October.

That’s at least the plan expressed by Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. Other vaccine frontrunners have suggested we might get more data in November.

In the meantime, be sure to tune in to Business Insider’s discussion on Monday, October 5 at 2 pm ET about what’s ahead in the COVID-19 vaccine race. Andrew’s assembled an all-star panel of experts, and I can’t wait to listen in!

Sign up for the webinar here>>

Also while we wait for data on whether or not the vaccines work: on Friday morning, recommendations dropped laying out who will be first to get a vaccine, starting with high-risk healthcare workers and older individuals.

One key slide reveals who will be first in line to get a coronavirus shot in the US when a vaccine becomes available.

Results from Pfizer’s vaccine are just one of 7 big events to keep an eye on this month in the race to find a way to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Read the full list here>>

We could know if a coronavirus vaccine works in October. Here are the 7 most important events to watch for this month.


30 under 40 transforming healthcare 4x3


Courtesy of Lori Kearns; Courtesy of Sabah Oney; Incredible Health; Buoy Health; Courtesy of Taison Bell; Samantha Lee/Business Insider


Introducing BI’s 30 under 40 in healthcare

It’s finally here!

Every year, Business Insider pulls together a list of 30 leaders under 40 who are changing healthcare. This year’s list, compiled after sorting through hundreds of nominations, is a good one if I do say so myself.

Our picks this year include doctors on the front lines, founders navigating the new realities of a healthcare system upended by a pandemic, scientists on the hunt for treatments for COVID-19 and beyond, and more.

We’ll have more stories on some of the honorees on the list, but here are a few to get started:

Many thanks to all who helped this come together!

Read the full list here>>

Meet the 30 young leaders who are forging a new future for healthcare in the pandemic’s shadow


google heatlh david feinberg 4x3


HLTH; Samantha Lee/Business Insider


Inside Google Health

Over the past few months, Hugh Langley and Blake Dodge have been working to get a look at what’s happening inside Google Health, a group formed almost two years ago that pulled together healthcare-focused folks from across Google.

They found that over the past two years, Google Health has struggled with turf wars and trust issues, and the group’s lost out on key deals as it works to figure out what it’s all about.

Read the full story here>>

Google’s secretive healthcare business wants to organize the world’s health information, but insiders describe how turf wars and trust issues are hamstringing the operation


Plus: In other news out of Washington, DC this week — Kimberly Leonard details some of the findings coming out of a congressional investigation into drug prices.

Internal drug company documents reveal how pharmaceutical execs targeted the US for price hikes.

Included are some very eye-opening emails tying executive compensation to price hikes.

Read the full story here.


Thoughts? Tips? Be sure to reach me at [email protected], or you can find our whole team at [email protected]

-Lydia

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