Friday, December 3

Senate announces recess until October 19 after multiple lawmakers test positive for the coronavirus


  • The Senate announced Saturday that it will go into a recess until October 19 after three Republican lawmakers tested positive for the coronavirus.
  • The latest to announce a positive test was Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, who said on Saturday that he had contracted the disease. Johnson, 65, is in quarantine and is exhibiting no symptoms.
  • Despite the recess, the Senate Judiciary Committee said that it will continue on in the process to nominate Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement Amy Coney Barrett to the bench.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Senate announced Saturday that it will go into a recess until October 19 after three Republican lawmakers tested positive for the coronavirus.

The latest to announce a positive test was Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, who said on Saturday that he had contracted the disease. Johnson, 65, is in quarantine and is exhibiting no symptoms.

Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina have also tested positive for the coronavirus. Both lawmakers serve on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is expected to hold hearings on nominating Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Despite the coronavirus having infected two of its members and despite the Senate going into recess, the Senate Judiciary Committee said that it will continue on in the process to nominate Barrett to the bench, according to the New York Times’ Eric Lipton.

The coronavirus has also spread to the White House. President Donald and first lady Melania Trump announced early Friday that they tested positive. Other advisers close to the president, including senior counselor Hope Hicks and Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, also tested positive.

The coronavirus has infected more than 7.3 million people in the United States, according to the latest data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Of that figure, more than 208,000 people have died from it.

This is a developing story.

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