Thursday, September 29

Social pressure and animal activism against large corporations

All of us who are dedicated to fighting for animal rights know that it is difficult and exhausting. Every day we see photos, videos and read articles about the harshness and, above all, the extent of the suffering and abuse that non-human animals suffer throughout the world. From Animal Liberation to Vivotecnia’s video, our blood has boiled in all of our veins and we have cried with rage, grief and indignation. There are days when it is hard to follow the fight from our small action groups against the big corporations and the powerful lobby. Therefore, it is important to celebrate our achievements. Here are some of them:

On August 8, 2022, Egyptair was the last major passenger airline to bow to international pressure and announce that it would no longer transport any more macaques from their countries of origin to the world’s (especially Western) laboratories. It is the third airline to make this decision this year, after Kenya Airlines and Air France. For its part, the Spanish Wamos Air announced a few months ago its intention to stop making these macaque transports in which it also participated, unless it was necessary to maintain the solvency of the airline and pay its employees. Perhaps the tens of millions of public money they received during the coronavirus crisis will help them make this decision firm..

It has been the social pressure and the constant campaigns on social networks, as well as the protest rallies, organized mainly by Action for Primates, One Voice, Stop Camarles and PETA -all from different countries but united and coordinated to fight for the same cause- those that have helped these airlines to opt for abandoning the cruel transport of macaques for laboratories. But there are still cargo airlines that carry it out, so it is important to follow the aforementioned groups on social media, as they will continue to organize actions and rallies to forever stop the trade in laboratory macaques. And now we know that it can.

This coming September, and after three years of rehabilitation in the sanctuary, the dolphins rescued by The Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project from the pool of the Melka hotel in Bali will be free to swim again in the seas of Indonesia. In 2019, when we published in Nietzsche’s Horse the opening of the world’s first dolphin sanctuary, we could not imagine that, with the dolphins living in the bay, aquatic life would return to it in such a short time and on such a large scale. The fish, shrimp and crabs attracted by the dolphins have consumed the algae deposited on the corals, which now flourish again, attracting ever larger and healthier fish. But the most surprising thing has been the rapid rehabilitation and recovery of the dolphins, after years locked up in a tiny pool of chlorine, where they were forced daily to interact with ignorant tourists who paid enormous amounts of money to do “therapy” with them. Even the biggest hurdle has been solved: thanks to the tenacity and contacts of people like Ric O’Barry and Femke den Haas, the dolphin Johnny, who had been destroyed by confinement, stress and poor pool conditions most of the time. of his teeth, he has received dental prostheses with which he will be able to hunt and feed himself for the rest of his life in the wild.


Animal law is also advancing internationally. At the beginning of August, the Argentine justice system once again taught the world a lesson, declaring the cougar Lola León a subject of law. After cases such as that of the orangutan Sandra and the chimpanzee Cecilia -both also in Argentina- or that of the Swiss chimpanzee in Brazil, Lola León is the last of the non-human animals to be legally granted rights; among them, the right to a dignified life in a sanctuary and not to continue with their confinement and isolation in the zoo. These cases create a precedent and are essential for the international legal fight for animal rights. Here in Spain, the Great Ape Project is working for Parliament to approve a Great Apes Law, so that it can take a firm step, and create a precedent, towards the consolidation of the basic and fundamental rights of great apes in our country. The petition can be signed here.

These examples of victories (and they are only three of the many that we have this year worldwide) also represent that all activism and actions, if carried out planned, together, helping and collaborating with each other, can create a David* * that no Goliath can stop.

**This article is dedicated to my nephew David, who just turned 9 years old.



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