Saturday, September 25

The scripts to use when introducing yourself at a networking event, conference, and any other professional meeting


  • Jen Glantz is an entrepreneur and the founder of Bridesmaid for Hire.
  • She created a series of scripts to use to introduce herself in different professional settings.
  • Networking won’t be as intimidating if you already have an idea of ​​what to say, she says.

It can be challenging to find the right thing to say about yourself when meeting someone new — but with a bit of practice, mastering your own elevator pitch can become an essential and useful skill.

Usually, introductory conversations center around who you are, what you do, and what you’re currently working on. Having a strong answer to the standard, “Tell me more about yourself” question can easily be done with a concise and clear script to follow.

When I first started attending conferences or going to networking events as a solopreneur, I wasn’t quite sure how to introduce myself. I either said too little or too much and the other person was confused.

So I spent some time writing out a formulaic approach for what to say about myself when meeting someone new. These are the scripts I use in different situations.

How to introduce yourself at a networking event

Once you determine the type of networking event (for example, is it just for your industry or open to all industries?), you can then pick a script to use for your introduction.

Since the purpose of these events is to make connections through a back and forth conversation, it’s important to be specific and short with your introduction.

For people not in your industry, you can say something like:

I’m [name], and I’m [professional title] at [name of company], which means I [basic explanation] and I’m excited about [your reason for being at the event].

For people in your industry, you can say:

I’m [name], and I’m [professional title] at [name of company], and I’m excited about [your reason for being at the event].

For example:

I’m Sarah, and I’m the lead product designer at H&W Enterprise, where I oversee production and development of our toy division, and I’m excited to learn about the latest trends of other industries tonight.

How to introduce yourself at an industry conference

When you’re at an industry conference, the people there have the same goals in mind around meeting new people and consuming great content.

One thing to add to your introduction to help you stand out and be memorable is a mention of something you’re working on or currently interested in.

I’m [name], and I’m [professional title] at [name of company], where I [main responsibility], and I’m currently working on/passionate about [what you’re working on/passionate about right now].

For example:

I’m Sarah, and I’m the lead product designer at H&W Enterprise, where I oversee production and development of our toy division, and I’m currently working on a product for the back to school season.

How to introduce yourself in a casual professional setting

Let’s say you’re not at a networking event or conference but find yourself still wanting to have a solid professional introduction in a more casual setting, like a lunch meeting or a virtual coffee chat.

It’s important to share who you are and what you do, but you can also add in something fun or interesting about yourself for this scenario. Doing that will help break the ice and make the conversation not feel overly formal.

You can say something like:

I’m [name], and I’m [professional title] at [name of company], where I [main responsibility]. Aside from that, I also [fun fact, hobby, interest, or passion].

For example:

I’m Sarah, and I’m the lead product designer at H&W Enterprise, where I oversee production and development of our toy division. Aside from that, I also love anything outdoors, whether it’s camping, hiking, or swimming, and spend my weekends doing that.

Although introducing yourself can be nerve-wracking, it’s worth getting good at. Following these scripts for different situations can help ensure you’re making the most of time spent networking.



www.businessinsider.com